Spectres, Blue and Dancing Too

Posted by on Nov 13, 2011 in Tokushima, Travel Volunteer Journey | 3 Comments
Spectres, Blue and Dancing Too

Truth be told, Tokushima prefecture offers us little we’ve not seen before. That might sound incredibly negative, but bear with me while I explain.
We started today by visiting Aizumicho, a government-endorsed indigo dyeing studio and museum. The technique was imported from China around 800 years ago, and Tokushima has made itself the Japanese home of the rich blue – almost every tourist area has indigo coloured bits and bobs; every restaurant has an indigo drape, dangling across their doorway. We were kindly offered to dye some handkerchiefs and got good and messy trying to recreate the phantom whirlpools from yesterday. However, though it was a lovely experience, it was very similar to our bengara dyeing in Okayama prefecture.

So we moved on to see some Awa dancing. It’s big business here – especially in August when over 350,000 people fill Tokushima city to bursting to watch and join in with the manic traditional dance. The origins of the fervent display aren’t clear, but out favourite explanation is that the whole thing started with an enormous drunken party to celebrate the opening of (the now-defunct) Tokushima castle hundreds of years ago. The dancing is quite a sight, and people – entirely sober – have great fun joining in. For us though? Well way back on day one, we saw some similar dancing, with identical head-dress in Toyama prefecture.

The next stop was in Wakimachi, a town famous for its traditional streets where owners play an endless game of one-upmanship with the size of their udatsu. Originally designed for fire prevention, the blocky re-enforcements soon came to be a symbol of wealth: if you could afford one, especially a big one (and better yet two) then you had announced your success to the rest of the street. For dumb tourists like us, we wouldn’t have noticed them if they hadn’t been pointed out to us – but around here, these things matter. Anyway, the houses look very authentic and there aren’t any power cables hanging over the street, adding to the time travel feel of the place. That’s all very nice, but, y’know, it’s not a million miles away from life in Gifu.

Growing despondent, we moved on and arrived at Oboke. There we came face to face with another shocking (and hilarious) Japanese parenting technique. Here in the hills of “Shikoku’s navel” parents, in order to save kids from themselves, tell stories of sinister spectres who live in the woods and commit an array of heinous deeds. There’s plenty of detail too, including a one-eyed beast who rides a headless horse, hunting any kids who stay after curfew. Just in case you were in any doubt about his intentions, the placard explains that he: “cuts or beats people – to death!” Shocking stuff, but, surely you’ll agree, very similar to the infamous Namahage back in Akita prefecture.

Worried that we were going to have nothing to write about, we were shepherded onto a boat to ride along the emerald green  river below. This tour (or something very like it) has been available in this gorgeous gorge for over 100 years, during most of which the boats have been floating above the same mega carp in the waters below. I almost began to complain that we’ve seen carp all over the country, and gorges, and autumnal colours, too, but then it hit me: all of those other things were spread across hundreds, if not thousands of miles of Japan and it’s taken us 60 days of non-stop travel to see it all. Yet today, in unassuming Tokushima, all if it was found within roughly an hour’s worth of driving.

Good form, Tokushima. Good form.

Our time in Tokushima prefecture was made possible by:

All of the companies mentioned above.

Once again, the tireless efforts of guide and mafia king pin, Mickey Honda.

The driving and organisational skills of local government representatives Mr. Hirotaka Yamazaki and Mr Shiro Ooka (Tokushima) and Mr Ozakai (Miyoshi City).

The sleek and ultra convenient Hotel Clement in Tokushima City. It was really busy while we were there, which is no surprise: great location, comfortable beds and lightning fast internet connection.

Similarly, the maze-like Hotel Hikyounoyu which sits in the middle of the Iyakei valley, proud to be the biggest hotel for miles around. It’s size isn’t its only asset: there’s a great onsen, some excellent dining options and – at least in our experience – some extremely friendly (and perhaps tipsy) septuagenarian guests with whom to discuss the world.

The lovely little soba joint that is Hashimoto in downtown Tokushima City.

Uzo no Michi for laying on the viewing platforms for the whirlpools in the Naruto Straits. And all the staff – not to mention curators – at the sprawling Otsuka Museum of Art. You can read all about both of them, here.

Both the Hotel Kazurabashi for use of their excellent footbath, and Iyaonsen for their open air bath. They each make the most of the superb alkaline water that naturally rises from the earth in this part of Tokushima. Curiously, there’s not even a volcano around to fuel the whole thing…

The Kazura Bashi bridge for being so, well, bridgey. Top bridging, really. Assuming you can find the courage to walk across it, that is.

 

正直に言わせてもらうと、徳島県ではあまり目新しいものに出会う事ができなかった。
そう言ってしまうと、とってもネガティブに聞こえる事は分かっているが・・・まぁまずは私達の説明を読んでみて欲しい。

今日はまず藍住町を訪れた。そこでは伝統的な藍染の歴史に触れる事ができた。藍染の技術は800年程前に中国から伝わったものだ。そしてここ徳島は古くから日本最大の藍作地帯として知られ繁栄してきた。そのためこの街では至るところで藍染を目にする事ができる。観光施設には藍染製品があふれ、レストランには藍染のテーブルクロスと暖簾がかかっている。そして私達は実際にハンカチを染めてみる体験をさせてもらった。そう、デザインはもちろん昨日鳴門で見た渦潮のイメージだ。それは非常に興味深く面白いものだった。だが・・・岡山県で体験したベンガラ染に似ている。

そして今度は阿波踊りを見せてもらった。徳島県で阿波踊りというと一大イベントで、8月には徳島市に350,000人もの人が押し寄せ、踊りに参加したり、鑑賞したりするそうだ。その始まりにはいくつかの説があるらしいが、私達がもっとも気に入った説は、数百年前徳島城が竣工した際、それを祝って当時の阿波守が『好きにおどれ』と命じたことがはじまりだとか・・・。踊りは魅力的なもので、思わず参加したくなるような楽しそうなものだ。だが・・・それは旅の初日に富山県で見た“おわら風の盆”にとても似ている。

次に訪れたのは、昔ながらの街並みが残されている脇町うだつ街道だ。うだつはもともと防火目的で作られたものだったが、そのうち裕福な家がこれを競って建てるようになった。
が、私達のように無学の旅行者には、その説明を聞いて示されるまで気にも止まらなかった。もちろん電線なども見えないように配慮してある昔ながらの街並みは美しく、まるでタイムスリップしたかと思わせるような趣があった。たが・・・岐阜県で見た街並みとそれほど変わらないような気がする。

ちょっとがっかりしながら次の目的地大歩危に向かった。ここではとってもショッキングなしつけ方法に出会った。“四国のへそ”と呼ばれるこの地域では、子供を守るために妖怪の話を聞かせるそうだ。それは数え切れないほど様々な内容で、例えば頭のない馬にのった一つ目の怪獣とか、夜で歩いている子供を誘拐する妖怪などなど。すっかりおびえてしまったのだが、これも思い返せば秋田県で出会った“なまはげ”に似ている。

もしかして今日のブログには書く事がないのかもしれないと思いながら川下りのツアーに連れて行ってもらった。このツアーは100年以上もこの美しい峡谷で受け継がれているもので、そこには大きな鯉が泳いでいた。が、日本中を旅してきた私達にとって“鯉”はすでに珍しいものではなく、美しい峡谷にもたくさん訪れ、紅葉も散々堪能させてもらったと、思わず文句をいいかけてふっと気がついたのだ。

確かに今日徳島で見たり聞いたり体験したものは、すでに別のエリアで見たり聞いたり体験したものだったのだが、それは60日間休まず旅を続けてきたからこその話だ、と。
だがここ徳島では、そんな日本中を旅しなければ味わえない様々な魅力が、たった1日で、数時間の移動をする中で体験できてしまうのだ!

徳島県、お見逸れしました。これは凄いです!

徳島県の滞在でお世話になった皆様

上記記載させていただいた皆様のほかに・・・

徳島県でのガイドを引き受けて下さったのは本多さん。今回も素晴らしい時間を過ごさせていただき本当にありがとうございました。

プランの計画、そして車での移動など、何から何までお世話になった徳島県の大岡さん、山崎さん、そして三好市の大境さん。本当にありがとうございました。

便利で素晴らしいホテル、ホテルクレメント徳島さん。お世話になりありがとうございました。ハードスケジュールの為、ホテルを満喫する事はできませんでしたが、最高の立地、快適なベッド、そして完璧なインターネット環境。最高でした!ありがとうございました。

そして祖谷峡にあるホテル秘境の湯さん、お世話になりました。祖谷峡で一番大きいホテルとのことですが、魅力は何と言っても温泉とお食事でした。そして夕食会場で一緒になったほろ酔い加減のお客さんと世界について語り合いました。楽しいひと時をありがとうございました。

徳島市にあるお蕎麦屋さん、橋本さん。おいしい昼食をありがとうございました。

大鳴門橋の渦の道の皆様お世話になりました。また大塚国際美術館の皆様、素晴らしいひと時をありがとうございました。(詳しくは昨日のポストで!)

ホテルかずら橋さんでは足湯を、ホテル祖谷温泉さんでは露天風呂を体験させていただきました。アルカリ性の温泉につからせていただき、旅の疲れが取れました。(なんで火山もないのに温泉が・・・?)本当にお世話になりありがとうございました。

そしてかずら橋。とっても美しい場所でしたが、とっても勇気のいる場所でもありました。皆さんも是非挑戦してみて下さい!

3 Comments

  1. Joe Lafferty
    November 13, 2011

    So, for the tourist who is time restricted Yokushima is Japan in miniature?

    • Katy & Jamie
      November 14, 2011

      Yeah, there and neighbouring Kagawa squeeze an awful lot into a very small area.

  2. dance for 3 year olds
    November 14, 2011

    I really appreciate the activities of performing arts. Thanks for posting.