Bridge Over Troubled Water

Bridge Over Troubled Water

Dizzy. I’m so dizzy, my head is spinning… But this whirlpool does end. A little too quickly, in fact. Forty-one metres below us in the Naruto Narrows dozens of little whirlpools are forming and collapsing, like a swarm of small hurricanes. They’re caused by a drop in water level that surges as the tide goes in and out, water flooding between Japan’s Inland Sea and the vast Pacific Ocean.
In terms of the history of the world, they’re very young – much younger than man, in fact. It’s believed that the Inland Sea was only formed after sea levels rose following the last Ice Age. That means we were a good 30,000 years old before the water invaded the land, then started washing back and forward to create these angry little swirls.

Today, they’re located directly under the Onaruto Bridge, which was completed as late as 1985. It was supposed to be an ultra-efficient connection between Shikoku and the mainland of Honshu: the plan was to have a four-lane highway with a shinkansen line below. Fortunately (depending on your perspective) the money ran out, so now, while cars thunder overhead, tourists – not high speed trains – shuffle along a walkway, trying to glimpse the whirlpools below. To help them, terrifying plexi-glass viewing panels have been installed. Failing that, punters can pay for a boat ride out to take a closer look at the gateways to the abyss.

That’s the theory anyway. But for us, it wasn’t so much like a scene from the incrementally more rubbish Pirates of the Carribbean, as a series of large sinks, draining very briefly. The best time to visit is apparently spring, so in late autumn, a bit too long after low tide, we got less natural wonder than the posters had led us to expect.

Mercifully, although Naruto has only around 60,000 inhabitants, it’s got another very expensive trick up its sleeve. To see if man could make something more impressive than nature had mustered, we headed around the peninsula – past a little man who makes a living poking out the eyes of fish – to Otsuka Museum of Art.

Put simply, this is easily the best collection of art anywhere in the world. What do you mean you’ve never heard of it? It’s home to the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, and his Last Supper (code and all), and Van Gogh’s Sunflowers, and Warhol’s Marilyn, and Munch’s Scream, and all of Rembrandt’s self-portraits. Not ringing any bells? It’s got most of Monet’s watercolours for goodness’ sake! It’s got the bloody Sistine Chapel! There’s Renoits, Constables, Picassos, Turners, Goyas, Vermeers… I tell you, it’s the best collection of art the world has ever known!

Except it’s not, of course. Despite costing $400 million, there’s not a single original work on display in Naruto, but rather an utterly colossal gathering of over 1,000 replicas of the planet’s most important pieces, sourced from over 2,000 years of human history. At huge cost to industrialist Masahito Otsuka, all of the work in his museum has been recreated exactly, with the precise original dimensions, on large ceramic panels.
There are two ways of looking at it all: either it’s as good as a tremendous collection of fine art, or it’s the world’s most expensive array of fancy bathroom tiles. In the end, our collective opinion straddles the divide.

On the downside, the medium, while very accurate, does have its limitations. The finish is distinctly shiny, for one, and the texture of a real painting is lost, for another. Worst of all, the enormous lines of the individual panels that make up some of the larger works are hard to ignore. Plus, with the sheer enormity of the museum, unless you have an entire day, moving around the 4km of wall space (the largest in Japan) is overwhelming. It’s possible to get masterpiece fatigue here, which probably isn’t healthy.
On the other hand, the collection is an art student’s dream, and gives less-moneyed Japanese people the chance to come and see convincing, life-sized replicas of the world’s most important artworks. It would cost several million yen to jet around the globe to see them all in their original housings. It’s structured very well, too, to lead visitors chronologically through the artists’ development, all the way from ancient Greece to Andy Warhol’s New York studio. Best of all – for Katy – is that here you can take pictures, allowing a rare chance to take detailed pictures of her favourite pieces.

After two hours sprinting through the artistic ages, we decided that, overall, it was man who had triumphed over nature when it came to Naruto’s main attractions. But then we went outside, and were quite happy to be proved wrong all over again.

 

めまいが・・・頭がくらくらするくらいのめまいがする。と思っていたら、渦潮はなんとか止まってくれた。ふぅー。私達の41メートル下に見える鳴門海峡では渦巻ができる様子を見る事ができ、それはまるで小さな台風が海の中で渦巻いているようだ。この渦潮は瀬戸内海と太平洋の水位差によって発生するものらしい。

それは地球の歴史でいうととっても新しい現象である。瀬戸内海は氷河期の終わりに海水面が上昇したことで形成されたと言われている。だとするとこの渦巻はその頃からということになるので、水が陸地に流れ込む30,000年も前から存在していた人間よりはずっと新しいことになる。

それら渦潮をこの大鳴門橋の真下に見る事ができるようになったのは1985年の事だ。それは四国新幹線も視野に入れ、本来本州と四国を結ぶ幹線ルートになるはずだったのだが、幸いなことに(これは人それぞれ意見の分かれるところではあると思うが・・・)予算削減となり、プランが変更になったことで、この“渦の道”が作られることになったのだ。そしてよりクリアに渦潮を見る事ができるよう、橋の一部がガラス張りになっているのだ。

とは言え、残念ながら映画の“パイレーツオブカリビアン”のような迫力迫るものを見る事はできなかった。なぜなら渦潮の見ごろは春らしいのだ。というわけでイメージ写真で目にするものとはちょっと規模の違う渦潮見学となった。

人口60,000の鳴門市には、渦潮以外にも別の“価値”あるものが存在する。そう、鳴門市の半島にたたずむ大塚国際美術館だ。

一言で言うと、この美術館は世界最高のコレクションを有する美術館だ。ダ・ビンチの『モナリザ』、『最後の晩餐』、ゴッホの『ひまわり』そしてアンディー・ウォーホールの『マリリン』、ムンクの『叫び』、レンブラントの『自画像』など、知らない人はいない、そんな世界の名作の全てを堪能できるのだ。

ただ、400億円を投じて作られたものとはいえ、その美術館には“本物”は一つもない。が2000年もの人間の歴史の中、世界中で生み出された1000点もの作品のレプリカをここでは一挙に目にする事ができるのだ。大塚グル―プの大塚正士氏が、陶板の技術を用いて本物と全く同じサイズのレプリカを作って展示したのがこの美術館なのだ。
これを世界最高の美術コレクションと呼ぶか、高級タイルの展示と呼ぶかは意見の分かれるところかもしれないが、どちらの意見ももっともだと思う。

ネガティブな面としては、それが例え本当に正確に複製されたものだとしても、やはり限界があることだろう。例えば本物がそれなりに“時”を感じされる風合いがあるのに比べ、ここにある作品は明らかに新しい。またその作品が大きければ大きい程、一枚一枚の陶板のつなぎ目が目につく。そして全長4キロにも及ぶ広大な敷地(日本一)に展示される全ての作品をたった1日で制覇することはできない。

と同時に、これらの世界最高峰の作品を実際の大きさで目にすることは、芸術を学ぶ人たちにとっては夢である。特に日本に住む学生にとっては、本物を見に行くよりもずっと手軽に訪れる事ができる。もし本物を見て回るとすると、数百万円のお金をかけて世界各地を回らなければならないからだ・・・。そして何よりケイティは自分のお気に入りの作品を思う存分写真に納める事ができることに感動していた。普通の美術館ではこうはいかないからだ。

たっぷり2時間美術館を堪能した後、鳴門市では自然が生み出した渦潮よりも、人が作りだしたこの美術館のほうが魅力的だったという結論に達した。
が・・・ホテルに向かう道中で目にした美しい夕焼けを前に、私達は喜んで前言を撤回することにした。