The Place Where Gods Are Born

The Place Where Gods Are Born

Earlier this year we spent seven weeks in America. This was a typical conversation:

“Where y’all from?”

“Scotland.”

“Oh I’m Scottish.”

“Really? Where were you born?”

“Arizona, but my great, great grandmother on my father’s side was from Elgin.”

“Right.”

There’s something nice about it, though, the North American obsession over tracing routes. It doesn’t often work like that in Europe, the motherland – we barely know more than three generations above our heads. Personally, I’d really like to know more, but the only thing I am certain of is that my surname is vaguely Irish. Yet if I was an American, I’d doubtless have it traced back to a specific village in the 18th century.

Let’s say the Emperor of Japan was similarly fastidious with his family tree, and let’s say you got a chance to talk to him. He may – though admittedly it seems unlikely – say: “Me? Oh I’m descended from a sea crocodile.” At which point you’d wait for the punchline before eventually realising that he wasn’t joking.

Shintos hold that the emperor is descended from the sun god, by way of Otohime, daughter of Ryujin, god of the sea. On giving birth to Jimmu, Japan’s first emperor, Otohime transformed back into a sea creature and plopped into the ocean. So, if you believe that, then the logic follows that Emperor Akihito, the 77-year-old incumbent, is the great x122 grandson of a sea monster (not to mention a few generations further along from the sun itself). It’s not metaphor, either: this is the literal belief at the core of the Shinto religion, despite war-time emperor Hirohito’s clear announcement that he was all man.

Anyway, today we visited the sites where a lot of these crucial Shinto events were said to have taken place two-and-a-half thousand years ago. And despite being feckless heathens, we thought they were utterly spectacular. Yes, even if you took away the Aoshima and Udo shrines (both of which are very pretty in their own right) the coast of Miyazaki is an amazing place – quite unlike anything we’ve seen in Japan before. Maybe it’s no surprise that this is where legends – or gods, if you like – are said to have been born.

 

 

 

今年の初め、私達はアメリカに7週間ほど滞在していたが、これはその時の典型的な会話だ。

“どこから来たの?”
“スコットランド”
“へぇー、私もスコットランド人!”
“えっ?どこで生まれたの?”
“私?アリゾナ。でも私のお父さん方のお婆ちゃんのお婆ちゃんはエルジン出身なんだ”
“ふーん・・・・・”

そうやって自分の祖先を知っているという事は、例えそれが北米人によく見られる変なこだわりだとしても、やはり素晴らしい事だと思う。ヨーロッパ人には見られない特徴で、せいぜい把握していて3代前までだ。個人的にはもっと知りたいと思っているが、私が知っているのは私の苗字がアイルランド系だということだけ。もし私がアメリカ人であれば、18世紀に私の祖先が住んでいた町の名前まで知っていただろうに・・・。

例えば天皇がその家系図に細心の注意を払っていたとして、そして更に例えばあなたが彼と話をする機会があったとしよう。天皇に『私?私の祖先はクロコダイルなんだよ』と言われたとしたら、それが冗談ではないと気付くまで時間がかかるだろう。

神道では、天皇は、海の神である龍神の娘、おと姫から生まれた太陽の神だとされている。日本最初の天皇・神武天皇は、おと姫が海に産み落としたと言われているのだ。なのでもしこの説を信じるのならば、現在77歳の明仁天皇は、海のモンスターの122番目のひ孫にあたるということになるのだ。これは神道で文字通り核となる部分なのだ。

ともかく・・・今日私達は2500年前に、神道にまつわるこれらの話の舞台になった場所に足を運んだ。その真意はどうあれ、それらの場所は本当に素晴らしかった。またそれらの舞台になった青島神社・鵜戸神宮がなかったとしても(もちろんそれらは本当に魅力的なのだが・・・)、宮崎は本当に素晴らしい場所だ。これだけ美しい場所だからこそ、こんな伝説が生まれたのだろう。そんな魅力のある場所だ。

1 Comment

  1. Kim
    December 5, 2011

    It does look very other worldly, maybe where writers let their imaginations get the better of them. ;)

    Beautiful pictures though, you really do capture the real spirit of the country.
    <3