Tale of Two Castles

Posted by on Dec 2, 2011 in Okinawa, Travel Volunteer Journey | 2 Comments
Tale of Two Castles

According to our copy of the Lonely Planet, there’s a school of thought that believes that America deliberately left Pearl Harbour, Hawaii, open to attack in order to draw the country into the Second World War. Obviously as uneducated travel volunteers we’ve no idea if that’s true, but it’s an interesting perspective – and one that seems sadly ironic here on Okinawa. As these islands are to Japan, so Hawaii is to America: beautiful but remote tropical destinations that only have so much in common with their mother nations. If the sacrificial pawn story is true about Hawaii, then that means it has yet more in common with Okinawa: this place was strategically given-up to the advancing Allied forces as the Second World War reached its grizzly conclusion.

After bombardment, then invasion, America kept two hands firmly on Okinawa during the rebuilding of Japan, a grip that was only loosened in 1972. It didn’t let go altogether – the US has maintained a huge presence on the islands (managing 18% of the land on the main island) ever since, though these days it seems primarily in order to occasionally shake it’s military fist at North Korea, and to provide a de facto military support for the Japanese, who were banned from having any substantial force of their own after the war.

It’s something of a strained relationship, but it’s not the first time Okinawa has been in this position. Actually America are the third power to have taken a slice of this former island-country.

Okinawa was only annexed to Japan in 1879, up until which it had been its own nation altogether: the Kingdom of Ryukyu. For 450 years, it had been a largely autonomous entity, but when the Mejii Restoration era Japanese came calling, the King handed over the keys and ended the whole thing diplomatically. He may have keen a proud Ryukyun, but he was not stupid – besides the money and title in Tokyo probably softened the blow.

Before that, though, Ryukyu had been a major trading hub, with China being its principal client. That shouldn’t be a surprise – the 160 island of Okinawa are closer to Taipei than Tokyo. It was to the Chinese emperors that the Kings of Ryukyu paid most of their tributes, and Chinese representatives that were invited to come and enjoy the tropical island life. A Chinese official sat-in on the Ryukyu coronations; in fact those ceremonies were conducted exclusively in Chinese.

The new kings were annointed the enormous Shurijo Castle complex, which straddles a hill looking over Naha, the prefectural capital. It was pummelled into oblivion during the Allied invasion: the doomed Japanese military HQ was buried under the castle and bore the brunt of the air attacks.

The reconstruction we visited today could hardly be more popular – it may well be the single busiest tourist attraction we’ve visited in Japan so far. An estimated six million tourists come to soak up the Okinawan sun every year, and a third of them head to Shurijo to learn more about the history of Ryukyu. Not to mention to drink in the views across Naha and over the turquoise water to the Kerama Islands.

For us, though, it was actually a little too crowded, and we were glad to get out and head to an altogether more peaceful gusuku (Okinawan castle) in the village of Kitanakagusuku, a short drive away.

The bold Nakagusuku currently lies in ruins, with only the strongest parts of its 15th century structure in tact. But we kind of like it that way – especially as, unlike virtually everywhere else in Japan, the castles of Okinawa are made of stone. They feel altogether more substantial and durable; and with plants creeping in an around them and butterflies shambling through the sky, somehow more magical. The views here were even more dramatic, with a vast panorama that takes in both sides of the Okinawa’s southern peninsula, encompassing the Pacific Ocean on one coast and the South East China Sea on the other.

As Katy looked up to take a picture of some pampas grass growing out of the ruins, we noticed a pair of Chinook helicopters making their way back to one of the American bases. “Okinawa is open to everyone” they say – it’s just unfortunate that it’s never really had much choice in that regard.

私達が持っているガイドブック“ロンリー・プラネット”によると、アメリカは第二次世界大戦を始めるために、意図的にハワイの真珠湾が標的になるように“残していた”と書かれている。残念ながら私達の教養レベルでは、その真偽について述べる事はできないが、もし本当だったとしたら、それは非常に興味深いし、そしてここ沖縄にとっては皮肉な事実と言う事になる。日本にとっての沖縄、そしてアメリカにとってのハワイは、どちらも本土から離れたところにある美しい島で、共通する点がたくさんあるように見受けられるが、もしハワイの真珠湾にまつわる説が本当ならば、沖縄との間に共通点が更に増えることになる。

戦時中の攻撃、そして戦後の侵攻と、アメリカが沖縄への手綱を緩める事はなかったが、1972年、ついに日本に返還された。だが在日アメリカ軍の基地は、今現在も沖縄本土の18%というかなりのエリアに渡って残されている。沖縄はアメリカが北朝鮮を統制するための格好の場所であり、また同時に自国の軍を持たない日本をサポートするという大義名分のもとに駐留を続けているのだ。それはかなり緊張した関係であるが、沖縄がこのような状況に立たされたのは初めてではない。そう、アメリカは3番目の国なのだ。

沖縄が日本の一部となったのは1879年の事で、それまでの450年、沖縄は琉球王国という独立した王国だった。だが明治維新の際に、王は日本に帰属することに同意したのだ。琉球王国は中国を主要な取引先として、中継貿易で大きな役割を果たしていた。考えてみれば驚くほどの事ではない。なぜなら160島々からなる沖縄にとっては東京よりも台北のほうがずっと近いのだから。琉球王国とって最も多くの貢物を送らなければならなかったのは中国の皇帝だったし、中国の高官達は南国に島にしばしば招かれていたし、また琉球王国の戴冠式にも招待をされていた。そして何よりそれらの儀式は中国語で行われていたのだ。

那覇市内を見下ろす丘の上にある巨大な首里城は、王宮で無くなったと同時に完全に忘れさられる存在となった。また第二次世界大戦中は、日本軍が首里城の下に総司令部を置いた事もあり、激しい砲撃を受けることになった。

今日訪れた再建版の首里城には、多くの観光客が足を運んでいた。一つの観光地としては、今まで訪れた中でもっともにぎわっていた場所かもしれない。沖縄には年間600万人の観光客が訪れると言われており、そのほとんどが首里城に足を運び、琉球の歴史を学んでいくそうだ。もちろんここから慶良間列島につづくターコイズ・ブルーの海の色も魅力の一つだ。

が・・・私達にはちょっと賑やか過ぎた首里城。車を少し走らせてたどりついた北中城にあるもっと静かなグスクに到着すると、ホッとした。

中城城址は15世紀の琉球王国の城で、今はその城壁のみが残っている。だが私達はなぜかこのグスクが気に入った。日本の他の場所にある城と違って、グスクは石で造られている。それは見た目にもがっしりしていて、耐久性がありそうだ。そんな中を蝶が飛ぶ姿はとても幻想的だった。そして東シナ海と太平洋を見渡すここからの眺めは、とにかく美しい。

ケイティが城跡に生えるススキを撮影しようとしたその時、アメリカ基地に帰るヘリコプターが視界にはいってきた。“沖縄は全ての人に開かれている”だが、全てが彼らの選択だったわけではないだろう・・・。

2 Comments

  1. Katalin
    December 3, 2011

    Great articles and pictures you two! Good work :)

  2. ted
    December 19, 2011

    I visited Nakagusuku with an Okinawan friend who is a bit of a shamaness. She told me that any planned construction near the ruins is doomed to fail. On the next hill there is a parallel set of ruins of a failed hotel that whose company went bankrupt before the building was completed.

    Perhaps Okinawa isn’t open to everyone after all…