The Fat and the Furious

Posted by on Nov 20, 2011 in Fukuoka, Travel Volunteer Journey | One Comment
The Fat and the Furious

In Europe, we’ve got our own sport for the big lads. Yes, there are some rugby players, who are much larger than average, but they’re only suited to certain positions. But I’m referring to darts, which allows a person to be as obese as they like, so long as they still have the strength in one arm to pick up a small piece of pointy metal, then a pint of lager, then possibly a meat pie. Missile in hand, they just need to find the energy to launch it at a piece of cork and – bingo! – that’s darts.

Famously, the fat boys of Japan have something that’s altogether more dignified, though try telling that to the average darts fan and they’ll likely reply: “Tee-hee! They’re fatties – in nappies!” Before going on to laugh at how sumo wrestlers bounce off each other like a couple of runaway space hoppers.

But we saw sumo today, at Fukuoka’s annual event, and I can assure you, it’s less like a kids game, and more like a brutal battle for survival. From afar, there’s a blur of blubber, before someone falls over and it’s all done, so it wasn’t until we looked at the pictures up close that we realised the level of violence done in those few seconds. Chokes, double-eye gouges, thumbs up noses, headbutts to the Adam’s apples… It’s shocking stuff. And then the coup de grâce: the mega wedgie. All of this, and when angle was right, the huge muscles underneath the fat became clear. Maybe that shouldn’t be a surprise: simply being able pick up a wrestler (or rikishi) must require a colossal amount of power.

One of the most surprising things about the whole sport is that despite the brutality, and especially the dirty tactics, when the decision comes, it is always received with good grace. In fact, winning or losing barely seems to make a difference to the wrestlers. I’m sure inside they’re dancing, or weeping, but from the outside they look like placid, rotund, mannequins. There are no gaudy celebrations here, no petulant displays of bad sportsmanship. And while that’s no doubt a good thing, we couldn’t help wishing that the wrestlers – and the crowd for that matter – would show a bit more passion.

Our out-dated guide book advises to buy tickets for these large sumo tournaments well in advance, or miss out altogether. But tonight, the stadium was only 70% full at best. That’s because since our book was written in 2007, sumo has been riddled with controversy and scandal. If it was football, or horse-racing, or boxing, or cricket, or anything to do with the Olympics, or FIFA, then y’know, it’d be no surprise at all. But the Japanese take – or at least took – sumo, the national sport, very very seriously. So when cases of match-fixing, gambling and drug-taking started to emerge (not to mention the troubling death of a trainee rikishi), they brought with them a deep and lasting shame, that the sponsors and crowds have not yet forgotten.

Added to all of that, the last ten years have seen the number of gaijin rikishi increase dramatically. Not only have the foreigners had the gumption to turn up, but they’ve been winning too. Tonight alone there were wrestlers from Russia, Bulgaria and – we think – America. (They’re easy to spot: they tend to be a good deal hairier than the home grown wrestlers.)

While wrestling has been around since before time began, sumo in something like its modern form has been around since before the Edo period, making it around 400-500 years old. I won’t pretend to know the importance and significance of the various rituals that go on before, during and after the bouts, but I can tell you this much: the Shinto faith plays a part in the traditions (including the tossing of ceremonial salt), and the distinctive sumo hair cut is designed to make the rikishi instantly recognisable in public (because a 6-foot obese Japanese man in a yukata doesn’t stick out already).

Anyway, once the cup has been sipped, the ground stomped and the salt tossed, the wrestling looked convincing, at least to our novice eyes. The crowd, finally whooping and chanting for the home-grown favourite, were pretty impressed too.

 

ヨーロッパには体格のいい若者が活躍できるスポーツがいくつかある。ラグビーは、ポジションが限られるとは言え、平均的な若者よりずっと大きい選手も活躍している。が例えばダーツなんかは、肥満体形であっても、ダーツの矢を投げられ、ビールのジョッキとミートパイが持てる腕力があれば、問題ない。ミサイルを手に、全エネルギーを使ってダーツの的を射る、これがダーツなのだ。ご存知のようにここ日本では、太ったスポーツ選手には威厳がある。なーんてダーツファンに言うと、“おしめをした、ただのデブじゃないか”と言われそうだが・・・。

今日私達は福岡で大相撲九州場所を観戦した。そして分かったのは、相撲は子供の遊びの延長では決してなく、生き残りをかけて戦う壮絶なものだということだ。それはどちらかが落とされて終わるのだが、写真を見ると、その凄まじい戦いの様子が伺える。顔を押さえつけ、眼つぶしを食らわせ、鼻を押さえこみ、のどぼとけをつかむ・・・それは想像をはるかに超えるショッキングな戦いだった。そしてちょうど適当な角度から見ると、贅肉の下にある筋肉をしっかりと目にする事ができる。まぁあれだけ巨大な力士を投げ倒さなければならないのだから、当然かもしれないが・・・。それにしてもすごい!

相撲を見ていて最も驚いたのは、例えどんなに残忍と思われる技を使ってやりあっても、勝負がついた瞬間にとても優雅な雰囲気になるのだ。そう、そこでは勝者も敗者もその立ち居振る舞いに大きな違いは見られない。もちろん心の中では喜び勇んで踊っている事だろう。でもおとなしく華麗なマネキンのように振る舞っているのだ。他のスポーツで見られるような、喜びのダンスや、怒りをあらわにするような場面を目にすることはない。その美学は素晴らしいと思うが、個人的にはせっかくなのでもう少し感情を表して欲しいなぁと思った。

古いガイドブックによると、大相撲のチケットは発売と同時に予約しなければ絶対に手に入らないとある。だが今日、この会場は7割ぐらいしか埋まっていない。このガイドブックは2007年に書かれたものだが、ここ数年相撲界に起こった数々のスキャンダルがこの状況の原因だということだろう。もしこれがサッカーや競馬、ボクシングやクリケットなどオリンピックやFIFAにつながるような競技であれば納得もできるが、どうやら日本人は国技である相撲をとても神聖なものとして受け止めているようで、“八百長”、“賭博”、“覚せい剤”などのスキャンダル(あえて暴行事件には触れないでおく)は許されないもので、いまだにスポンサーや相撲ファンの信頼を取り戻していないようである。

更に付け加えるとすると、ここ10年程、外国人力士の活躍が著しくなったことも一因ではないだろうか。外国人が入門すると言うだけでなく、目覚ましい活躍をしているのだ。今日だけでもロシア、ブルガリア、そしてアメリカ人の力士を目にした。(髪に特徴があるので、日本人力士より見つけるのが簡単だ)

取り組みが始まる前には、400-500年前・江戸時代から続く儀式が行われる。それぞれにどんな意味があるのか、ここで知ったかぶりをするのはやめることにするが、塩をまくなど、神道の理念がこの伝統につながっているようだ。また独特の髪型は、街中で彼らが力士である事をすぐに見分けられるようにしたのだろうか・・・。

ともかく・・・口をゆすぎ、塩をまいて始まる取り組みは、やはり印象的なものだった。
そして自分の御贔屓の力士を応援する観客にも目を奪われた。

1 Comment

  1. nutcracker nj
    November 21, 2011

    kids of my preschool love Sumo fighting pretty much. Instead of watching fight, they like to see these heavy weight sumos.