Mega City One

Posted by on Oct 12, 2011 in Tokyo, Travel Volunteer Journey | 5 Comments
Mega City One

Travelling inevitably leads to comparison. It’s a simple, unfortunate human condition. How do I know a to be good? I compare it to b and c. It’s very hard to switch off. Why not just enjoy a in its own right? Who knows? Like I said, it’s unfortunate.

But it does, at least, give your judgement some grounding. What use would it be to run around in startled wonder at every little thing? A person could soon end up a gibbering fool, not knowing what was good and what was bad. If a, b and c are all simply “awesome” then how can you pick them apart?

Thankfully, Katy and I have visited a fair few of the world’s great cities and have accrued an alphabet of letters with which to compare Tokyo. So having been to London, New York, Rome, Shanghai and the rest, how does it measure up?

The first thing to say is that, unexpectedly, Tokyo is the quietest of the bunch. The cars are near-silent and produce few emissions; there aren’t many smog-belching buses either. No one hits their horn. Street vendors don’t shout. People appreciate barcodes and have better things to do with their time than haggle over the cost of a bottle of water. Even in the sprawling Tsukiji fish market, people are dignified. All things considered, Tokyo is a pretty sedate monster.

Yet it’s loud in other ways. Across its colossal expanse, people aren’t afraid to splash colour across their clothes, hair and faces. There is a positively idiotic number of good looking people per square metre. Some crave attention at any cost. There is an absurd obsession with wearing glasses that carry no frames; thigh high boots and hot pants are extremely popular – not least with the men. There’s another look that puts a very strong emphasis on impossibly large hair and frilly clothes that come in golds and creams. So many folk are trying to stand out from the crowd that they’ve formed a psychedelic mob of their own.

In almost every way it feels completely removed from the rest of Asia; Tokyo feels far removed from Japan itself. Just as London has become its own teeming entity in Britain, and New York feels like its own nation within the United States, so Tokyo demands to be regarded in its own terms.

In some parts of Hokkaido, a kid with a two-foot tall mohawk and pierced eyebrows might be burned as a witch – here they’re just another barman.

The world comes to Tokyo, and in a town so relentlessly cosmopolitan as this, it’s possible to eat natto for breakfast, a hamburger from a street stall for lunch and Michelin-starred French cuisine for dinner. And after that, head to a bar and take your pick of the world’s whiskies. Of course it’s all fabulously expensive, but what does that matter? Everything and everyone is represented. Tokyo wants for nothing.

The city seethes with life at all times of every day, you need only visit Shibuya junction to see this. Or head to any subway station at 6pm. Businessmen fill the carriages like black and grey jellybeans in great jars, and yet the trains make their way seamlessly through eight lanes of traffic, with monorails above those, and metros buried underneath the ground below.


With five Hong Kong’s worth of people breathing the same air, there are naturally some vagrants lurking too. Like all the cities of the world, they’re drawn to the vast parks, to snooze on benches while ducks quack at their feet. If they’re regarded as untidy, though, they’re in the minority. People yelp and squeal about the neatness and order in Singapore, but Tokyo is every bit as clean, and even more functional. There are 35 million reasons for the Capital of the East not to work. But, somehow, it does.

How does it compare to other cities around the world? Make no mistake about it: this place is awesome. I really mean it.

Our time in Tokyo was made possible by:

Guide and fellow twitcher Eriko Bando, or Ellie as she likes to be called. She knows a vast amount about Tokyo and its feathered population (not just the ones in Akihabara) and it was a pleasure to spend time with her.

Mr Iwamura of Chiyoda Sushi who introduced us to the world of standing restaurants, and who showed us that it’s very dangerous to ever claim “this is the best sushi” because you never know what will be served next. If the price was ten times what it is (80 yen per piece) it’d still be a bargain. His branch being so close to the Tsukiji fish market no doubt helps how incredibly fresh it all tastes.

The luxurious Daiichi Hotel which surely gave us the world’s biggest bed to sleep in. We needed a GPS device just to find each other in that thing. They kindly put us up for two nights, meaning we could tuck into two of their superb breakfasts and genuinely get a chance to relax after enormous days walking around Tokyo’s infinite streets.

Everyone at Tentsu Saikan for giving us a great meal, but especially chef Hitosi Yamanobe. He is the latest person to baffle us with tales of his heroism in the aftermath of the tsunami. With the ground still shaking, he drove to Miyagi to start cooking for the survivors and fellow volunteers. For the last seven months, he’s being going back as often as he can. Being able to share a beer with him in his own restaurant was a goddamn privilege.

It’d be wrong to say that we’ve missed hamburgers over the last month, but even if we’d been eating them every day, the fare served up at Roti Roppongi would be outstanding. Mammoth portions, succulent meats and a wine list to die for, it’s no wonder it’s survived 10 years in this cut-throat part of town. Best of all, it’s not got a smaller sister restaurant, Pike Place, newly opened in, Shiba-Koen where punters can grab a coffee and watch the world go by the Tokyo Tower.

The Rihga Royal Hotel, into which we stumbled after another hard day’s walking. Tucked away in a lovely, quiet part of town, it’s got great views, enormous fluffy towels and chocolate cereal for breakfast. Chocolate cereal!

 

旅は必然的に“比較”へとつながる。これは残念ながら人間の性でもあるのかもしれない。
aを素晴らしいと知るためには、bやcと比較しなければならない。この“比較する事”を止める事は難しい。なぜ人は比較せずに、“そのもの”を楽しんだり評価したりできないのだろうか。まぁだから非常に“残念”な性なのだが・・・。

だがそれは同時に判断基準を持つ事にもなる。比較がなければ全ての事に疑問を持たなければならないし、何がよいのか何か悪いのかも分からないまぬけになってしまうかもしれない。が、もしaもbもcも素晴らしかったら、何を基準に選ぶのだろうか?

ラッキーな事に私達は世界のいくつかの国や街を訪れた経験があり、ここ東京との比較対象になりうるロンドンやニューヨーク、ローマや上海などにも行った事があるが、さてどうやって違いを図るべきなのだろうか?

まず最初に、東京はとにかく“静かな”街だ。これは完全に予想外。前述した都市の中では間違えなく最も静かな街だと言える。車はとにかく静かだし、排気ガスを振りまきながら走る車もほとんどなく、誰もクラクションを鳴らしながら走ったりしない。露天のお店の人たちが大声を上げるような事もなく、料金は全てバーコードで管理されていて、ペットボトルのお水1本を買うために永遠と続く値段交渉をする必要もない。世界で最も大きな市場である築地市場でも、彼らの発する声には威厳こそあれ“うるさい”ものではない。
それら総合すると、東京はとっても平穏な怪物だと言える。

だがそこは同時に物凄くにぎやかな場所でもある。街ゆく人は色とりどりの洋服に身をつつみ、ヘアスタイルやメイクを楽しんでいる。一平米辺りにいる“きれいな人”の数はもしかしたら世界一なのではないだろうか?フレームのない眼鏡をかけたり、細身のパンツにヒールの高いブーツを合わせたり、個性的なスタイルが多く目につく。そしてアレンジの施されたヘアスタイルやフリルをふんだんにつかった洋服など、自分達で作り上げた特殊なグループの中にいても更に目立つ格好をしている人ばかりだ。

それらを見ていると、日本はアジアの一部ではないと思えてくる。そして東京も日本の一部とは言い難いように思う。例えばロンドンやニューヨークが、イギリスやアメリカの中でそういう存在であるように、東京ももはや日本の一部という域を超えているように感じるのだ。
北海道の街では奇異の目で見られるような人々も、東京では至って普通の人でしかない。

東京は本当に完璧なまでに国際的な街だ。朝食に納豆を食べ、お昼にはハンバーガーをかじり、そして夜はミシェランスターのレストランで夕食を楽しむ。食後は世界中のウイスキーが揃うバーに行く。もちろんそれは飛び上がるくらい高くつくが、欲しいものは何でも手に入る、これぞ東京だ。

街は、渋谷のスクランブル交差点に代表されるように四六時中騒然としている。そして夕方のラッシュアワーの時間の地下鉄の駅には、サラリーマンがあふれ、それはまるで黒とグレーのジェリービーンズが瓶のなかでうずめきあっているようだ。そしてそんな中を電車、モノレール、地下鉄はお行儀よくそしてスケジュール通りに運行して行くのだ。

香港では街ゆく人と浮浪者と呼ばれる人が同じ空気を吸っている。他の都市でも見られるように広大な公園のベンチでいびきをかいている人の足をあひるがつついている。外見を気にするような人はいない。シンガポールではきちんとするという事、そして注文することに大声を張り上げる。だた東京ではそんな光景は見られない。街はきれいだし、全てが整然と機能的だし、数え切れないほどの理由の元に、ここ東京は間違えなく東洋の首都であると言えるだろう。

こんな素晴らしい街・東京をどうやって他の都市と比べるというのだろうか。
東京、最高です。

東京都での滞在でお世話になった皆様

東京初日のご案内を引き受けて下さった坂東英利子さん。お世話になってありがとうございました。エリー(そう呼んで下さいと言って下さったので・・・)の知識は凄い!多くの事を教えていただきました。そして何よりとっても楽しい時間を過ごさせていただきました。本当にありがとうございました。

ちよだ鮨の岩村さん。私達に最高のお寿司の味を教えて下さいました。ちよだ鮨さんでお寿司をいただいていたら“これが今まで食べた中で一番おいしいです”とは言えなくなりました。なぜなら、次から次へと更においしいお寿司が出てくるからです!築地市場のすぐそばにあるからネタも新鮮。おいしいお寿司を本当にありがとうございました。

第一ホテル東京さんには最高のベッドでゆっくり休ませていただきました。
あまりに広くて大きなベッド、私達はお互いGPSを使わなければ見つけられない程でした(笑)今回なんと2泊もご提供下さったおかげで、おいしい朝食を2度も堪能させていただいただけでなく、一日の疲れをしっかり取らせていただきました。お世話になりありがとうございました。

天厨菜館の皆様、あたたかいおもてなし、本当にありがとうございました。
山野辺シェフのお料理は最高でした!そして山野辺シェフのボランティア活動のお話にも胸をうたれました。山野辺シェフはまだ余震が収まらないうちから車を飛ばして宮城に向かい、非難されている方々やボランティアの方々の為にお料理を振る舞われたそうです。この7ヶ月、山野辺シェフは可能な限り現地へ通い、その活動を続けておられます。そんな素晴らしい山野辺シェフと、シェフのレストランでビールを飲み交わす事ができた事、一生忘れません。本当にありがとうございました。

この1ヶ月、ハンバーガーを食べたい!と願っていたわけではないけれど、例えそれを毎日食べ続けていたとしても、それでも食べたくなるほどここ六本木ロティのお食事は“別格”でした。肉汁たっぷりのお肉と、最高の品ぞろえのワインリスト。この飲食店の激戦区で10年もやはり続けている理由は明確です。そしてその姉妹店Pike Placeが最近芝公園にオープンしたそうです。東京タワーを見ながらコーヒーの飲める場所。私達のおすすめです♪

リーガロイヤルホテル東京さんでも快適な滞在を楽しませていただきました。
閑静なエリアにあるホテルからの美しい眺めは、一日の疲れを癒してくれました。ふかふかのタオルにチョコレートシリアルの朝食。最高でした!本当にお世話になりありがとうございました。

5 Comments

  1. Eric
    October 12, 2011

    It’s also a dangerous claim to say, this is your best post !

    Because :
    a) in this case, you just can’t compare a with b – a very moving post about Miyagi and an awe-loaded post about Tokyo…
    and
    b) you never know what’s coming next !

    So, I won’t say it… and will just stick to: That’s a great one!

    Keep it up!

    Eric

  2. Joe Lafferty
    October 12, 2011

    I think you’ve nailed it! Congratulations to you both.

  3. Robert
    October 13, 2011

    Yes this is Tokyo, a singularity with so many people in such a small place.

  4. James Mundy
    October 13, 2011

    Yeah, I am liking this too. Tokyo is an awesome city. Japan is an awesome country. I think people who don’t know about the place will get that back from your posts.
    Keep em coming…..and write some good stuff about Gunma please. Yoroshiku!

  5. Tee
    October 14, 2011

    Some amazing pictures, that really highlighted the story. Good job!

    Cheers, Tee

    Tee is Senior Editor of digital magazine http://www.CostaRicaCLOSEUP.com about Costa Rica