Home Sweet Hostel

Posted by on Sep 21, 2011 in Hokkaido, Travel Volunteer Journey | 3 Comments
Home Sweet Hostel

There comes a time in every traveller’s trip when homesickness comes calling. The timing of it is often weird. We both felt terribly homesick in the Galapagos Islands once, after travelling for 11 months. Given that it’s one of the most heartbreakingly unique, unspoiled places on Earth, it shouldn’t have happened – it wasn’t like we were short of amazing distractions, or like we’d just left home.

But instead, our brains thought of people in the UK, people we’d have loved to have been there with us. How would my mum have reacted if a sea lion tickled her toes with its whiskers? What would Katy’s dad have said if he’d seen frigate birds fighting in mid-air?

Instead of standing slack-jawed in glee, we – briefly – started to feel quite glum.

So there’s times like that. And then there’s the things you miss. Stupid, meaningless things that you would place little value on at home become important. Certain foods and drinks, yes, but other stuff too, homely stuff.

Having only been travelling for a week, we haven’t really started missing anything yet (and Katy brought a jar of Marmite with her, just in case). But that hasn’t stopped us falling quickly in love with the Refore Youth Hostel. There a few reasons for it – the fact that it reminds us of our brilliant year of backpacking is definitely one – but really it’s because we’ve felt genuinely welcomed into Akira Kato’ home. He’s showed us around, he’s cooked for us (mostly using ingredients from his own garden or fish from the local market), and even though his English is, in his words “very low”, he’s tried his damnedest to talk to us. His wife even baked us a cake.

Dashing between ryokans and hotels has been great over the last week, but it’s been really nice to feel like we’re in someone’s home for the first time. None of the décor quite matches here: the place has evolved, not bought in one batch from a shop. The beds are comfortable (the fact that there are beds at all has been a nice change from the ryokan floor – we’ll explain that to non-savvy types in a future post); there’s a dog outside in the yard; Akira’s son tested his English with us; and tomorrow we’ll all have breakfast together.

There’s some bad weather scheduled to arrive tonight, but out here on Hokkaido’s Shakotan Peninsula, wrapped in duvets, knowing there’s a family nearby, we feel somehow much safer, much more snug.

It’s sounds like such simple stuff, but if you’re missing something – or someone – you’d be surprised how much it can matter.


旅を続けているとふっと淋しくなる瞬間、いわゆる“ホームシック”におそわれることがある。そしてそれは突然、予期せぬタイミングでやってくるものだ。私達は以前11ヶ月も旅を続けたある日、ガラパゴス島でその“瞬間”におそわれた。きっと地球上でもっとも自然の姿を残している場所の一つ、ガラパゴス。そのありのままの美しさを目にした時、まるで今旅に出たばかりかのような、何かが恋しくなるような感覚におそわれたのだ。もしアシカがそのひげでお母さんの足をくすぐったら? もしケイティのお父さんがカモメたちがけんかするのを目にしたら何と言うだろうか?イギリスにいる家族の事を思い浮かべてあれこれ想像するうちに急に淋しくなってしまったのだ。

旅を続けているとそんな気持ちになったり、またばかげた、意味のないような些細な事がとても大切なものになったりする。それは何気ない食べ物だったり、飲み物だったり、普段は特段価値を見出さないものが急に愛おしくなるのだ。

100日の旅に出てたった1週間。まだそんな淋しい思いにはおそわれていない。(ケイティは“万が一”に備えてマーマイトを持参しているが、まだ必要ないようだ。***マーマイトとはイギリスではおなじみのトーストやクラッカーに塗って食べる食品)そんな、ホームシックとは無縁の私達だが、それでも一瞬にしてこの家庭の温かさを感じるリフォレ積丹ユースホステルのファンになった。それは昔バックパックで旅行を続けていた時の楽しい思い出がよみがえったからだけではなく、何よりここのオーナー、加藤明さん一家に温かいおもてなしを受けたからだ。加藤さんが作っている野菜や、地元で採れた魚をふんだんに使った夕食。そして加藤さんの奥さんは手作りのケーキも用意してくれていた。彼らは決して英語が得意ではなく、そして私達も日本語は得意ではないけれど、それでも加藤さん一家の温かさは十分に感じられた。

この1週間、素晴らしい旅館やホテルにお世話になり、それは何とも贅沢なひと時だったが、今晩このユースホステルではまた違った意味で“贅沢”なおもてなしを受け、そしてそれは私達にとって初めて日本の“家庭”を感じる経験でもあった。温かみのあるインテリアと、ベッド。(ここ数日旅館でお世話になる事が続いた私達には“ベッド”はすでに珍しいものになっているのだ!)お庭には犬がいて、加藤さんの息子さんとは、彼が学校で習った英語を使って会話を楽しんだ。明日の朝食はみんな一緒に取らせてもらう事になっている。

これらはなんら特別ではないかもしれない。でもふっと淋しくなった時、そんな“当たり前”のものが特別になる。それは旅に出たからこそ気付く事ができる大切なことなのかもしれない。

3 Comments

  1. Neomattlac
    September 21, 2011

    That seems like quite the elaborate meal.
    Also, reading this cleared up some questions I had about hostels. ^^

  2. sports hotel florida
    October 6, 2011

    Supreme Post…Tanks 4 sharing!

  3. Tooch
    January 6, 2012

    Love the way the food is layed out in exactly the same way on each side of the table- a feast for two!