For Relaxing Times…

Posted by on Nov 4, 2011 in Osaka, Travel Volunteer Journey | 2 Comments
For Relaxing Times…

They say in the original Gaelic it means “water of life” but in most of my experiences it’s had the opposite effect. I first tried whisky at the age of 11 during a family holiday to the Scottish Highlands. We’d visited a distillery and had a tasting at the end, during which my father snuck me a sip. I was too young, it was too strong, and it was all I could do not to be sick.
And that was the end of it: I didn’t like whisky and there was no telling me otherwise. My poor father bought me an 18-year-old bottle for my 18th birthday, and a 21-year-old for my 21st. Both are tucked away in the attic, unopened to this day.
Since I left Scotland three years ago, this whisky-apathy has put me at a loss some with some people. “But you’re from Scotland,” they say, disappointment wrought across their faces, “how can you not like it?” (I can hardly complain at this level of cultural understanding: as a young boy I sincerely believed that there was something encoded deep into human DNA that gave all Asians an innate skill in martial arts.)
Anyway, I don’t like whisky. Or at least I didn’t. Now as 30 approaches like a bullet train to the face, it seems something in my own DNA is changing. Just as once upon a time I didn’t like coffee, and couldn’t stand red wine, perhaps now my taste buds are maturing again. Maybe, a mere 17 years since that fateful day in the Highlands, I’m ready to start liking whisky.
I might be almost 6,000 miles from home, but why not start giving Scotland’s national drink serious consideration at a Japanese distillery? Today, halfway between Osaka and Kyoto, we went to the the country’s most successful whisky maker, Suntory, to do just that.

Shinjiro Turii’s company started whisky-making in 1924, having decided to set-up at Yamizaki, the site of several natural wells. The water here had a long-standing reputation for its purity: not far from the Suntory plot, it was said to have given rise to the practise of the traditional tea ceremony.
Turii knew the product he wanted and he had secured the land. The problem was he didn’t actually know how to make good whisky. He phoned Scotland’s International Whisky Hotline* and asked for an expert. “Whit? Nae need pal, ye’ve awriddy goat wan,” came the unintelligible reply. Eventually he discerned that, in fact, there was a whisky expert living in Japan – not only that, but he was Japanese.
*There’s no such thing.

Masataka Taketsuru had travelled to Scotland five years previously to learn whisky making at Glasgow University. He studied hard, and worked at the now-defunct Hazelburn distillery in windy Campbeltown, Kintyre. Into the bargain, he had fallen in love with a Scottish woman, who he married and brought back to Japan.
Turii and Taketsuru were a natural match too. In some ways, they needed each other: since returning to Japan, the latter’s plans to make whisky had stalled and he had been forced to work as a school teacher to make ends meet.
They set to work, but questions were soon being asked. Why did it all take so long? Sake only takes a few months. How could the men possibly need so much barley (whisky’s core component)? Locals suspected they were feeding a monster.
To set their minds at ease, Turii released Suntory’s (and Japan’s) first-ever bottle of single malt, ahead of time, in 1929. They début brand, the White Label, promptly bombed. The following year they brought out the Red Label. The same thing happened.
This wasn’t in either of their plans. It turned out that the centuries-old brew had a taste that was just too alien for local palettes. The peaty flavour dwarfed sake, beer and all types of food. This was a huge disappointment to master distiller Taketsuru. He had followed the Scottish method meticulously, and yet, after waiting five years for the results, people hated his product.
The founder Turii resolved to launch a square-bottle containing a milder blended whisky that would appeal to the masses. Ironically, this was the technique that had allowed Scotch whisky to become all powerful: being less expensive and more drinkable. Never mind what the purists thought, money had to be made.

Alas, Taketsuru was one of those purists. Around this time, a rift must have formed between the two men, who had visions of success leaning in very different directions. By 1934, after a decade at Suntory, Taketsuru left the company, moved to Hokkaido (and to a climate he believed, correctly, more closely resembled that of Scotland) and set up a rival firm that followed the Scottish method. Like Suntory, it was a big success. Today his company, Nikka Whisky, continues to snap at his old firm’s heels in whisky sales.

As we tour the Yamazaki distillery, Makoto Sumita, of Suntory’s Quality Communication Spirits Division, concedes that even now the companies’ rivalry is “not so friendly”. Suntory is bigger and busier than ever, but it still uses the same Yamazaki water, bubbling from the same sources. Over 100,000 guests a year come for this tour, to learn about the distilling process, the importance of the casks used for maturation, and a thousand other details that contribute to Suntory being Japan’s biggest whisky-maker.

Sales rise year on year, domestically and internationally; looking at their figures for the last decade, there’s no hint of a financial crisis. Three years ago, a cask of extremely rare 50-year-old Suntory single malt went on sale for ¥1 million (£8,000) a bottle. It sold out in a few hours.

It’s all driven by a dedication to making a quality product, the same dedication that, in 1944, had employees digging holes in the nearby hills to hide barrels of whisky from Allied bombs (which thankfully never arrived). Today Suntory’s various blends and malts are multi international award-winners. They’ve come a long way since the disastrous White Label days.

One thing they haven’t been able to do is to make the whole process faster. Actually, Suntory now take much more time over their product. The younger blends tend to be 10 years old, while the more refined single malts typically range from 12 to 18 years, though 30-year-olds are available for big spenders.
At the end of the tour, we’re invited to a tasting, to experience exactly how casks made of different woods affect the drinks’ flavour. Whisky goes in clear and comes out amber, or gold, or sometimes almost red depending on what wood is used. The taste is drastically affected too. That which matures in sherry casks made of Spanish oak, for example, smells distinctly of maple syrup, though sadly tastes nothing like it. More unfortunate is that, as my cheeks start glowing with investigative professionalism, I decide that the fifth whisky is my favourite. I say unfortunate because it is the Yamazaki 18-year-old single malt, which retails for around ¥20,000 (£160) a bottle.

The older whiskies are more expensive for a number of reasons, but mostly because of evaporation. Earlier in the day Mr Sumita had explained that the cask’s “breathing” causes around 3% evaporation every year. After about 15 years, that will have taken more than a third its contents. By, say, 30 years, there’s more air than liquid. “It’s a kind of tax – angels drinking it,” said Sumita, as we walked around an enormous maturation room with several hundred thousand litres of whisky in different casks. “There must be a lot of drunk angels, ” he said.

At these prices, they’re welcome to it.

 

私の経験ではその効能はどちらかというと真逆なのだが、ウィスキーはゲール語で“命の水”という意味だ。私が初めてそれを口にしたのは11歳の時、家族旅行でスコットランドのハイランドに行った時の事だった。そこで訪れた蒸留所では最後に試飲ができるようになっており、父はこっそりと私にも飲ませてくれた。だが私はあまりにも子供だったため、ウィスキーは強すぎて気持ち悪くなった。

そしてそのトラウマからか、私はウィスキーが嫌いになった。
私の父は私が18歳の時には18年物のウィスキーを、21歳の時には21年物のウィスキーをプレゼントしてくれたが、残念ながらそれらは今も屋根裏部屋で開けられることなく眠っている。

3年前スコットランドを離れてからというもの、この“ウィスキーに無関心”だという事実がなんだかとてもマイナスに働いてしまう事が多い・・・。『えー、スコットランド人なのに・・・』と、とっても残念そうな顔で言われ、『嫌いなわけないでしょう』と付け加えられてしまうのだ。(それはまさに幼い男の子が、アジア人はみな格闘技が強いと信じて疑わないようなものとでも言おうか・・・)
とにかく私はウィスキーが嫌いだ。いや、嫌いだったのだ。だが私の中で何かが変わった。それはまるで昔は嫌いだったコーヒーや赤ワインが好きになったりしたように、好みが変わったのかもしれない。とにかくハイランドを訪れてから17年経った今、いよいよウィスキーを楽しめる大人になったという事かもしれない。

今私は故郷のスコットランドから6000マイルも離れたここ日本の蒸留所で、スコットランドの国酒(?)であるウィスキーについて学ぼうとしている。大阪と京都の府境にある日本で最も有名なサントリー山崎蒸留所でその機会を得る事ができたのだ。

サントリーの創業者、鳥井信治郎がウィスキーを作り始めたのは1924、天然の井戸に恵まれ、また昔からおいしい水として有名だった山崎にその蒸留所を作った。
鳥井はどんなウィスキーを作りたいか明確な理想があり、そのために用地を確保していた。だが実際にどうやってウィスキーを作るかという点については全く分かっていなかったのだ。彼はスコットランド国際ウィスキーホットライン(実際そんなものは実在しないのだが・・・)に電話をし、専門家をお願いした。すると『Whit? Nae need pal, ye’ve awriddy goat wan』と全くわけのわからない返答がきたのだが、ようするにウィスキーの専門家で日本に住んでいる人がおり、なんとその人は日本人だというのだ!

竹鶴政孝は5年ほど前にスコットランドのグラスゴー大学でのウィスキー作りについて学んでいた。彼は熱心に学び、そして今は無くなった、キンタイアのキャンベルタウンにあるヘーゼルバーン蒸留所で経験を積んだいた。またスコットランド滞在中にスコットランドの女性と恋に落ち、結婚し、その後一緒に日本に帰国している。
鳥井と竹鶴はお互いに必要な存在だった。竹鶴は帰国後ウィスキー製造に着手する予定が頓挫してしまい、学校の先生として働かなければならない、そんな時に出会ったのだ。

彼らやいよいよウィスキー作りを始めるのだが、日本酒と違って長い年月がかかるウィスキー作りに多くの人が疑問を呈した。
そして1929年、鳥井はサントリー、いや日本発のシングルモルト・ウィスキーを世に送り出したのだ。それが『サントリー白札』だった。そして翌年『赤札』を発売。だが当時の日本人にはあまり受け入れられなかった。ピート独特に匂いが強いウィスキーは日本酒やビールを飲み慣れた日本人にとって異種なものだったからだ。この事は竹鶴を大きく落胆させた。彼はスコットランドの手法を忠実に再現し、5年という年月をかけて日本産のウィスキーを生み出したにも関わらず、世間はそれを受け入れてくれなかったのだから。

鳥井はウィスキーを角瓶に入れ、味を飲みやすく改良することで大衆へのアピールを行った。“もっと安く、もっと飲みやすく”皮肉にもそれがスコッチウィスキーの人気に火がつく事になるのだ。とにかく売り上げを挙げなければならなかったのだ。

この頃には鳥井と竹鶴の間には、それぞれが目指すものの違いが大きな溝となって表れており、1934年、竹鶴は10年間の勤務の経てサントリーを退社し、気候がスコットランドに近い北海道に移り、スコットランドの手法に忠実なウィスキー工場を設立することになる。今ニッカと呼ばれるそのウィスキーはサントリー同様大きな成功を収めている。

本日山崎蒸留所をご案内して下さったサントリーのクオリティー・コミュニケーション・スピリッツ部門の角田誠さんによると、ここでは製造量は年々増えているものの、今でも開業当初と同じ水源から出ている山崎の水を使ってウィスキーを醸造しているとのこと。年間10万人以上の人が工場見学に訪れ、蒸留手法、貯蔵樽の重要性など、サントリーが日本で最も大きなウィスキー工場として成功しているポイントを学んでいくのだ。

国内外を問わず、売り上げは右肩上がり。サントリーの決算書を見ていると、そこに“不況”の影は全く見られない。3年前、非常に貴重な50年前のサントリー・シングルモルトが世に出され、それはあっという間に100万円の値で売れた。

それらの成功は徹底した品質管理と情熱によるものだ。1944年、戦火から逃れるため(幸いこの蒸留所が被弾することはなかったが・・・)近くの丘陵地に貯蔵樽を隠す穴を必死になって掘った、その時から脈々と受け継がれているものなのだ。『サントリー白札』が世に出てから長い年月が経った今、サントリーのウィスキーは国内外で高い評価と称賛を受けている。

それだけ徹底した品質管理と改善を重ねても、一つだけ変えられない事がある。それはプロセスを早くすることだ。むしろサントリーは以前より時間をかけて製品を生み出している。今サントリーの製品で最も若いものでも10年で、ほとんどのものは12-18年で、30年などというものも人気があるらしい。

ツアーの最後にテイスティングをさせてもらい、貯蔵樽がウィスキーの味にどれほどの影響を与えるのかを体験させてもらった。ウィスキーは美しい琥珀色もしくは黄金色、時には赤みがかった色で、それは何の木が使われたかによって変わるらしい。そしてそれは色だけではなく味にも多大な影響を与えている。シェリーの貯蔵樽はスペインのオークでできており、例えばはっきりとしたメープルの香りがし、でも味は全く別物だ。そして残念なことに5番目にテイスティングさせてもらったものが私のお気に入りになってしまった。
なぜ残念かって?それは・・・山崎18年で一本20,000円もする高級品だったからだ。

古いウィスキーが高級なのはいくつもの理由があるが、その最大のものは蒸発である。毎年3%ほどが蒸発している事からも分かるように、樽は息をしているんだと、角田さんが説明してくれた。その計算で行くと、15年後にはそのかなりの量がなくなってしまうということになる。30年となると、液体より蒸発してしまった量のほうが多くなってしまうのではないか・・・。角田さんは、何百・何千リットルのウィスキーが眠る貯蔵樽を案内しながら、“蒸発分はいわば天使に払う税金のようなものだ”とおっしゃった。
ほろ酔い加減の天使がいる場所。それがサントリー山崎蒸留所なのだ。

2 Comments

  1. Joe Lafferty
    November 4, 2011

    The Angels’ Share has been the term used in Scotland for generations to describe the loss due to evaporation – I too remember the visit to the distillery!

  2. Colleen
    November 7, 2011

    Tempted to go! Have lived in Japan for 6 years and haven’t made it to the distillery yet. Thanks for the information and history!